Where should I start?
Should I invest in coins?
What is gold bullion?
What are my coins worth?
Where can I get a coin catalog?
How can I get in touch with Coin Dealer Inc?

Note: Price indicators on this FAQ are for common dates ONLY. Other coins should be evaluated on an individual basis.
 



  Where should I start?

We recommend the purchase of a coin catalog.  This will not make you an expert, however, it will show you by date and mint mark the coins which are more valuable.  Remember that the catalog is intended to be a price guide and is not an exact indicator of actual Buy-Sell transactions.  Just like the stock market, the market supply and demand for certain items cause the value of your coins to either increase or decrease. 

The price indications on this FAQ are for common dates of each 'type.' Other coins should be evaluated on an individual basis 

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Should I invest in Coins?

In recent years, coins as an investment has not been rewarding. With inflation in check, all collectible investments have performed poorly. (Naturally, there are exceptions) In the 70's and 80's, coins were considered the best investment of their day. Coins outperformed the Stock and real estate markets. I can't see the future, but the old adage of buying straw hats in the winter time has always been sound advice. In other words, buy items that are out of favor and hold for the new cycle. Every dog has its day. 

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What is Gold Bullion?

Gold Bullion is a Gold Bar (or Ingot) or a coin that carries a premium of 15% or less over the actual gold content. We use 15%, because that is the figure the US government determined for sales tax purposes. Sales Tax exemption on a minimum purchase of $1,000 in gold bullion is allowed. 

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What are my coins worth?
Please be sure to check our "appraisal" section for current prices of commonly asked coins!

A coins value depends on the following: 

  • Condition or Grading - the amount of wear in details; the amount of damage.
  • Mint Marks - usually a letter denoting where the coin was minted; Values of coins with the same dates may have different mint marks and be worth substantially different amounts.  (The omission of a mint mark denotes the Philadelphia Mint)
  • Rarity - the number of coins minted and the amount of surviving pieces
  • Supply and Demand - the desiribility of the item;  The amount of people looking for a particular item in relation to the market supply.
        A person not experienced in coin grading generally believes a coin is of a higher condition because "I can see everything clearly." This is not a valid description to have a coin evaluated. 

        A coin must be seen by a professional to accurately evaluate an item. 
 

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I have a Wheat Penny.  What is it worth?

The majority of wheat pennies are common and are currently worth about 3 cents each. Only those of a low mintage with the right combination of date and mint mark are worth more. 
 

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I have a Silver Penny.  What is it worth?

During World War II, there was a great need for copper for the war effort. In 1943, Zinc was substituted for the copper. This coin is worth approximately 10 cents. 
 

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I have a Buffalo Nickel.  What is it worth?

Buffalo Nickels must show a full date and have a value of forty cents each and up. Buffalo nickels with excessive wear showing no dates are worth about fifteen cents. 
 

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I have a Silver Dollar.  What is it worth?

Silver dollars issued prior to 1936 have a value of $10.00 and up based on a collectible condition of at least "Very Good" which means a full rim and some hair detail without any other damages. 
 

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I have a Silver Certificate.  What is it worth?

Silver certificates of one dollar denominations of issues 1935, 1957 in worn condition are valued at $1.40, at $2.00 in almost new condition, and $4.00 in mint condition.  Those dated 1935, 1934, 1928 are valued at $5.00 and up. $5.00 denominations are worth $8 and up, while $10.00 denominations are worth $20 and up. Above notes can not be torn or written on to have stated values.
 

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I have Silver Coins.  What are they worth?

Dimes, quarters, and half-dollars that were minted prior to 1965 are 90% Silver and have a value greater than their face value due to the silver content contained, not due to rarity. 100's of millions of these coins were minted. Present value is based on a calculation of the price of spot silver on the commodity markets. Exact pricing depends on demand and quantity at a given time. As of late each $1.00 in face value is worth between $7.00 and $8.00 per $1.00 in silver coins. Half dollars issued from 1965-1970 are only 40% silver and have a current worth of $1.40-$1.70. Coins in Mint Condition (never used) and rare dates are evaluated on an individual basis. 

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I have none of the above.  What should I do?

You have four ways you can contact us: 

  • By Phone - Call Us at 212-768-7297 or Fax Us at 212-768-7299  Tuesday thru Thursdayu 9am-5pm EST.
  • By Mail

    CDI
    c/o Bob Morton
    PO BOX 267
    Woodbury, NY 11797

  • By Email - Send email to:newyorkcoins@mindspring.com 
  • From Our WebSite - Fill out our on-line appraisal form 

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Where can I get a coin catalog?

You can try your local library or book store. We can offer links to the following recommended books: 

A Guide Book of United States Coins : 2007
The Official 2007 Blackbook Price Guide of United States Paper Money
2008 Standard Catalog of World Coins: 2001 to Date
2008 Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000
2007 Standard Catalog of Modern World Gold Coins 1801-present: 1801-present
Standard Catalog of World Coins: Eighteenth Century 1701-1800
Standard Catalog of World Coins: 17th Century - 1601-1700
Collecting World Coins: More Than a Century of Circulating Issues- 1901-present

Note:  All the Foreign Coin Books are large reference books the size of telephone books and contain all countries by dates rather than types. 

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How can I get in touch with Coin Dealer Inc?

You currently have four options: 


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